Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Cocoa Whipped Cream

Stabilized Cocoa Whipped Cream, Day 1
Well, today was another "early out" for me and my kids. I don't fully understand the decision-making process, but here in Iowa, sometimes when it snows, and they expect it to get messy and dangerous for the drive home, they let school out 1 1/2 to 2 hours early. Today is one of those days, so I'm at home with some new Penzy's Dutch cocoa, a quart of heavy cream, and an itch to do some blogging (oh yeah, and my kids too). I refer to this cocoa whipped cream occasionally when replying to comments on Food Pusher, so I decided to do two things today: 1. give this yummy whipped cream its very own post, and 2. try using the gelatin mixture that I use for Stabilized Whipped Cream to stabilize the cocoa whipped cream--something I've been meaning to try for a while. So what you see above is the stabilized cocoa whipped cream.
I usually don't bother stabilizing the cocoa whipped cream because I think the cocoa has a stabilizing effect on it, especially when the cocoa whipped cream is used to frost cake. The cake absorbs the excess moisture that would otherwise escape and turn the whipped cream flat. I've actually observed the cocoa whipped cream sort of shrink as it stays in the refrigerator over a period of two or three days, and I'm assuming that's because moisture is soaking into the cake. I might be wrong, but I'm just telling you that's what I imagine happening.
What you see at the top of this post is the fresh cocoa whipped cream. At the bottom is the same cup of whipped cream the next day. When I scooped into it there was no liquid at the bottom--the cocoa whipped cream maintained its firm texture. The only difference that I could see is that it got slightly darker after spending the night in the refrigerator. It was delicious too, by the way. I might have eaten that entire little bowl and rationalized that it was just like eating a bowl of chocolate ice cream.
By the way, I LOVE this stuff. I eat it as is. Usually I make excessive amounts for cakes or cupcakes  JUST so I'll have plenty leftover to pipe into a large spoon to eat alone (meaning the whipped cream is alone and so am I because I don't want anyone to witness me indulging like that). If you decide you'd rather try this out on a cake or cupcake, try out one of these recipes listed below. I love all of them very, very much, and I think that's pretty much because all of them have plenty of this stuff on top. 

Cocoa Whipped Cream Cupcakes
Chocolate Cake with Cocoa Whipped Cream
My Chocolate Birthday Cake



Cocoa Whipped Cream
  • ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • 2 tablespoons hot water
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
In a small mixer bowl, mix cocoa and sugar.  Stir in hot water until a smooth paste forms.  Allow to cool for about 5-10 minutes before proceeding. Add cream.  Beat just until firm peaks form.  Do not over beat.
Makes about 2 cups
(From Nestle Cocoa box)


Stabilized Cocoa Whipped Cream
  • ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • 2 tablespoons hot water
  • 1 cup plus two tablespoons heavy whipping cream, divided
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 1/2 teaspoon unflavored gelatin powder
In a small mixer bowl, mix cocoa and sugar.  Stir in hot water until a smooth paste forms. Allow to cool while you prepare the gelatin mixture.
Sprinkle gelatin over 2 tablespoons cold water in small bowl to soften. 
Scald 2 tablespoon of the cream; pour over gelatin, stir until gelatin is dissolved.
Refrigerate until consistency of unbeaten egg white. (This takes about 10-15 minutes.) Then, with a whisk, beat until smooth.  
Add remaining cream to the cocoa and sugar paste.  Beat until whipped cream just starts to thicken and you start seeing the beater tracks. Add the gelatin mixture at this point and beat just until firm peaks form.  Do not over beat.
Makes about 2 cups


Here's the gelatin mixture. As usual, I let this firm up a little bit too
long, but it doesn't seem to affect the final product as far as I can tell.
Stabilized Cocoa Whipped Cream, Day 2
Stabilized Cocoa Whipped Cream, Day 2--perfect texture




12 comments:

  1. Hey Food Pusher!I have been looking for a stabilized whipped cream frosting for ages now!I can't wait to try this one out today, will let you know how that goes!!(fingers crossed)

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  2. When you scald the cream do you remove the scum from the top like when scalding buttermilk? Or is there any scum?

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    Replies
    1. I do not remove that layer; I just mix it in and I've never noticed a problem.

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  3. I just made the stabilized version and it turned out funny. I whipped it up till I had soft peaks forming then turned around to get my cupcakes ready. Then I noticed that my whipped cream was falling flat again. I mixed it up some more but now it's starting to separate and go mushy. Any ideas of what I did wrong? By the way, it tastes amazing even if it doesn't look good!

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    Replies
    1. I am sorry that happened to you. :/ I can't say I have an answer as to why, and it's actually happened to me before, and I have never figured out what it was. If it's any encouragement, this kind of thing is a fluke, and is not likely to happen again. I think. I know this is a lame response, but it's all I've got.

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  4. I'm trying to make stabilized Mocha whipped cream to fill a stacked cake. Do you think this recipe would work if I added some cold brewed coffee or instant espresso dissolved in water or would the extra liquid keep the cream from whipping? Any advice would be great. Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Hmm. I'm making a guess here, but I think the espresso powder dissolved in a little water--or along with the cocoa if you're still adding that--would be the way to go. I'd be concerned that the amount of cold brew coffee you would need for the intensity of flavor you're looking for would affect the whipping of the cream. Let me know what you try and what happens.

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  5. That's what I thought too. Thanks. I'm also thinking of using chocolate instant pudding mix to stabilize and adding the coffee/espresso to that. I've used the pudding before and it works well (though it's a little heavier than I would like ). I'll let you know what works. Thanks again!

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  6. When you listed white sugar , is that powdered sugar ?

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    Replies
    1. I mean granulated sugar, not powdered. Sorry for any confusion, and sorry for taking so long to reply.

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  7. Can you pipe the stabilized cocoa cream?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, it pipes beautifully—but I recommend piping immediately after whipping because once it sets up, it won’t pipe as smoothly.

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Hello! If your comment is more of a question about something you are cooking RIGHT NOW, please email me the question in addition to posting it here. I check my email more frequently than I check my blog comments. :)
mckellysu@gmail.com

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