Sunday, June 19, 2011

Stabilized Whipped Cream Frosting

Stabilized Whipped Cream
I used locally glass-bottled cream today.
Before finding this recipe, I often wondered how bakeries and restaurants could keep their whipped cream frosting so beautiful and firm throughout the day, and even after I took baked goods home.  I knew some of them used non-dairy whipped toppings, but others, like the Chicken Pie Shop, I knew used real whipped cream on their delicious sweet offerings.  After some searching on the internet and some terrible recipes, like the one that came out with little nuggets of gelatin in the whipped cream, I found this one that creates a whipped cream that is light, smooth, and stable.  The original recipe at cdkitchen calls for some lemon juice.  I didn't want any lemon flavor in what I was making, so I omitted it, and the recipe turns out great anyway.
I use this whipped cream on cream pies and cakes, when I want to have the finished product as something to look at and not just consume immediately.  If I'm not making a show of it, I just use my isi whipped cream dispenser (like they use at Starbucks) with simple cream and a little powdered sugar. That way, I don't have to cover the whole pie with whipped cream at one time. I will just dispense it on each serving.


*Note: I have recently discovered mascarpone cheese as an ingredient in whipped cream frosting. It's much simpler to make the Mascarpone Whipped Cream Frosting than the stabilized whipped cream, and I think it's better for cupcakes because it's got more body to it. It's still super light tasting, is super creamy, AND it holds its shape nicely. Check it out.





Stabilized Whipped Cream Frosting

     --adapted from cdkitchen

Ingredients:
  • 1/2 tsp unflavored gelatin powder
  • 2 tbsp cold water
  • 1 cup whipping cream (regular or heavy--I always use heavy cream)
  • 2 tbsp confectioner's sugar
Instructions:
1. Sprinkle gelatin over cold water in small bowl to soften. 
2. Scald 2 tablespoon of the cream (this means you put the cream in a pan and bring it to a simmer on the stove); pour over gelatin, stirring till dissolved.
3. Refrigerate until consistency of unbeaten egg white. (This takes about 10-15 minutes.) Then, with a whisk, beat until smooth. 

4. In a stand mixer with a whip attachment, or with a hand beater, whip remaining cream and sugar just until soft peaks form; whip in the smoothed gelatin mixture, stopping to scrape the bowl twice. Whip until stiff peaks start to form, but be careful not to over beat. You will probably only need to whip it another 10-20 seconds before it's done.

Fills and frosts top of 2 8" or 9" cake layers; or frosts 10" angel
cake or spongecake. Tops one standard 9" pie with some left over to enjoy from a spoon.  Stands up well, even in warm weather. Keep leftover frosting and any product topped with it in the refrigerator until ready to eat.

Recipe is easily doubled.

You can also make flavored stabilized whipped cream frosting by using flavored gelatin powder. Click here for that little experiment.


Gelatin mixture--I let this get too firm in the fridge, but it worked.


Banana Cream Pie with Stabilized Whipped Cream
Chocolate Cream Pie with Stabilized Whipped Cream on top
Same pie as above, 2 days later.  The whipped cream 
is holding up to the time, fridge, and plastic wrap.
This little Three Bite Chocolate French Silk Pie is three days old,
and the stabilized whipped cream still looks fresh.

208 comments:

  1. hi friend, i don't have any questions. you answered the one i had about stabilized whipped cream. by the way, i'm so glad you called it by its proper name and not "whip cream" like so many often do in error. you pie looks amazing. got any great coconut or banana cream pie recipes? we're still in school. one more week. can you believe it? warzy

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  2. Karin, I don't understand why you're anonymous. I don't understand this blogging thing completely. I don't have a coconut or banana cream pie recipe. You should go to allrecipes.com to see what they have. That's where I get lots of my recipes.

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    1. Thanks for your information, and that is a great substitute for using heavy whipped cream from the container that is purchased from the grocery store, but I use a product called Pastry Pride which is also a stabilizer whipped product and will stay that for at least a month refidged and also holds well in warm weather, I live in las vegas and this is what I found to work best for me, if you can find it in your area give it a try.

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    2. Also if you need to stabilize the whip cream you can add a tablespoon of instant pie filling (my favorite is cheese cake flavor) this works even in humid temps

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  3. Hello, I chanced upon this great post, looking for a solution to make a friend happy on her wedding day. She wants cupcakes instead of a whole cake and I was at my wits end trying to figure out how to make the frosting not droop in this humid conditions of ours. I'm glad I found you. I'll have to test this out and meanwhile ... yumm! :D Thanks so much!

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  4. Well, I'm glad I was able to help, ping. : ) Please do let me know how your tests go!

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  5. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I hate it when I used whipped cream on pies & other stuff and it "wilts" or gets soggy looking. Pinning this for future reference!!
    Tracey @ The Kitchen is My Playground

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  6. Tracey, I'm glad you found the post helpful! Happy baking and whipping!

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. Just found this via Pinterest. I've always wondered about stabilized whipped cream too! I can't wait to try this. Thanks for sharing.

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  10. Glad to be helpful, Stephanie! I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I have. :)

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  11. Any way to not make it with Gelatin?

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    1. As far as I know, gelatin is the key ingredient to stabilize the cream. Another comment once suggested adding a tablespoon of vanilla pudding powder, but I think that has gelatin in it as well. All of the recipes I've ever found had the gelatin. I do know that the cocoa whipped cream I have the recipe for on this blog stays pretty stable, but then you'll have cocoa flavored whipped cream....

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    2. Oooh! I just found this recipe at allrecipes.com: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/sturdy-whipped-cream-frosting/
      It calls for non-fat cream cheese, but I also make a yummy mascarpone frosting that comes out like a thick whipped cream without the tang of a cream cheese: http://food-pusher.blogspot.com/2011/10/whoopie-pies-with-mascarpone-frosting.html
      I bet THAT would work for you. If you live near a Trader Joe's, I would recommend using their mascarpone cheese. I think it tastes better than what I got at SuperTarget.

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    3. Thanks so much! I was thinking maybe Agar or something thickening like that. But this looks great.

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    4. Well, please let me know if you try the mascarpone frosting and let me know how it works out for you.

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    5. The allrecipes frosting is DELICIOUS, but I found that it wasn't as stiff as I would have liked it.

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    6. That's interesting that the Allrecipes frosting wasn't as stiff as you would have liked it. You might want to try the recipe I have for mascarpone frosting, if you're looking for a relatively thick whipped cream type of frosting: http://food-pusher.blogspot.com/2011/10/whoopie-pies-with-mascarpone-frosting.html

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    7. I was watching a cooking show once I think called cooking 911 something like that and the point was people had a fav dish they wanted to make and kept messing up and the chef taught them how to do it. In the episode the dish was banana creme pie and to stabalize the whipped creme the chef used a marshmallow that had been zapped in the microwave a few seconds just to heat and puff it up. He then added it to the whipped creme at the final stages of the whipping. I haven't tried it but it worked on tv. Hope that helps

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    8. Oooh, Sundee! I remember that show! Wasn't it Tyler Florence who was the emergency chef? I didn't see that episode, but I think I might give that a try. It makes sense because I think marshmallows are largely gelatin...and sugar. Thanks!

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    9. try adding 1 tbsp skim milk powder. always works for me, and so easy.

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    10. Cream of tartar does wonders for me, though I haven't paid too much attention as to how long it lasts... probably not as long as the gelatin though.

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    11. A marshmallow works beautifully!

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    12. Marshmallows are made with gelatin, which is why it is probably getting the same results.

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  12. This will be the *perfect* topping for DD's rainbow cupcakes. Yes, another blasted rainbow party. But hers is going to be epic. I promise. Anyway, any idea how long this will hold up if you make it in advance and pipe later? I'd be piping it on cupcakes around 9am for an 11am-1pm party. Think I could make it the day before and let it hang out in the fridge?

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  13. And another thing, do you happen to know if colored sugar sprinkles would bleed on this frosting?

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    1. Lauren, I think rainbow cupcakes with cloud-like whipped cream frosting on top sounds adorable! I'll post a pic here if you send me one to mckellysu@gmail.com.
      Back to your question, you can make the whipped cream frosting ahead of time, place in the piping bag, and keep in your fridge for use the next day. It doesn't look quite as creamy, but I think the banana cream pie you see at the top had that done.
      As for the sprinkles, you're going to have to be the trailblazer on that one. My suggestion is that you keep a little of the frosting when you make it, put it in a little bowl and sprinkle on some sprinkles. Let it sit in the fridge overnight and see what happens. I'd even pull it out of the fridge as soon as you wake up and let it sit on the counter for an hour or two to see if any bleeding occurs. My guess is that there will be some bleeding. I would also go so far as to try it early in the morning with some of the frosting in the piping bag, and let it set out with the sprinkles (that is if the in the fridge overnight sample did in fact bleed).
      Please let me know what happens.

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  14. Please remember that for food safety this still needs to be refrigerated - and so does the cake or pie.

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    1. Thanks for that reminder. I think it's common sense to keep this refrigerated, but I shall revise the post now. My in-laws did not refrigerate the coconut cupcakes (that had Cool Whip) I left at their house, even though my bro-in-law helped me put them in the fridge when I got to their house. Two days later I saw them on the counter. I told my sis-in-law they needed refrigeration, and she said she'd just eaten one. A few hours later she told me, "Yeah, those DO need to be refrigerated." I'll update the post now. :)

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    2. I'm making a 2 layer white cake with strawberry filling for my daughter's 21 birthday, she wants whip cream icing. I've never made this icing before, I was looking this up on the Internet and ran a cross your site. This recipe looks interesting, I'm going to try it but I have one question will the filling bleed through the icing?

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    3. I've never actually tried what you're proposing. I think if you put a rim of whipped cream frosting around the edge of the cake so that it sort of "contains" the filling, you probably won't have trouble with the filling bleeding through. If you try it, please come back and let me know how it went. Thanks!

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  15. R you on pinterest. If so please add me gina pruett if not email when u r at gina1142@gmail.com thank you love the recipe

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  16. Great tip, and the pies look amazingly delicious! Thanks for the post! :)

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    1. You're welcome, and thanks for the compliment! :)

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  17. Is it possible to overwhip it?

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    1. Hmmm...that's a good question. I think it probably is still possible to turn this to butter by over-whipping. With this whipped cream, I try to err on the side of soft peaks, since the gelatin keeps it firm. So, I think my answer is "yes, it is possible."

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    2. Yes, I just overwhipped mine and turned it into butter! And I did not have any success with the gelatin mixture if it was over-cooled. I tried it twice... first time butter, second time lumps because, although I cooled the gelatin just 4 minutes in the fridge and it was a perfect consistency, I then let it sit out of the fridge while I whipped the remaining cream. By the time I went to add it in, it had gelled too much. No amount of whisking the gelatin mixture made it smooth again. So next time I'm going to cool it 4 minutes again and then immediately slowly stir in the rest of the whipping cream plus sugar etc. And then whip it. But not whip it too much! I have a knack for overwhipping cream... My daughter loves the butter!

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  18. How long can the unused cream be stored in the refrigerator? . . .

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    1. That is a good question, Aarti S. I don't know a definite answer. I usually try to use the leftover whipped cream within about 4 days, but I have been known to test a little after a week and a half to see if it's still good, and then use it on something only I am going to eat. I'm terrible about clearing out things like this. I don't know if this really answers your question as much as it tells you how flaky I am...

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  19. Hi ... I would like to know how long can the unused cream be stored in the refrigerator. . .

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  20. I was wondering if you can make the mixture and put it in your whipped cream dispenser. Forgive me if you already answered this question

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    1. Hmmm... That is a great question, Jan. I have never tried it, because it's always been an "either/or" thing for me. You got me curious, though, so I googled "gelatin in isi" and I came up with an article on the isi website about using gelatin in "espumas," which I then googled. Here's the link to the wikipedia article that popped up as the first hit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foam_(culinary)
      From the looks of it, you can put a mixture containing liquid into the isi/whipped cream dispenser. I would allow the gelatin/cream mixture to cool, but not firm up, and then whisk it with the cream and pour into the dispenser and use as you normally would. I'll try it some time, but if you do it before I do, please let me know how it goes.

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  21. I am not a very good cook so I need you to explain to me what you mean by scald. When you say clear gelatin, do you mean jello gelatin or the gelatin that you use for canning jam and jelly?

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    1. I should probably revise my post and be more specific. Scalding is when you heat milk to boiling and turn it off quickly and/or remove it from the heat so it doesn't boil over. I honestly think it was done in the days before pasteurization in order to kill any harmful microbes, but recipes still call for it, so I write it in.
      Unflavored gelatin powder...if you click on the words in the recipe, it will take you to the Knox Gelatin website where you can see a photo of the box and some other recipes. It's basically JUST the gelatin without any sugar or flavors to make jello. So, I think you could make your own jello out of fruit juice with it, although I've never used it for that. It comes in boxes with three or four paper packets containing about 1 or 2 teaspoons each of the powder. You can usually find it near the baking soda and such in your grocery store. Or by the Jell-O brand gelatin maybe.

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  22. No need to scald the milk, that's needed to "set up" things like custards and yogurt. It changes the properties of the milk, maybe the protien.

    Just watched a Cooking Channel show with a professional baker. She got 4 cups of heavy cream out of her fridge, then added 8 teaspoons plain gelatin. Added sugar and vanilla and it came out perfect. No scaldimg milk, no softening gelatin. So simple.

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    1. Well, there you go. I'll have to try that one.

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  23. Thanks for the great tip with the gelatin. I was told by a professional baker that they just use confectioners sugar in their whipped cream. The cornstarch in powdered sugar keeps it stable. Have you heard of that? Also, King Arthur Flour sells a whipped cream stabilizer but I have not looked at what's in it.

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    1. That is interesting. I have used confectioners sugar, but I don't like my whipped cream very sweet, and I think the amount I'd have to add to get the cornstarch effect would ruin it for me. All I know is that this gelatin thing works great and makes the whipped cream last a long time. :)

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  24. Do you think this frosting would be okay if I frosted it and then had the cupcakes displayed for 1 to 1/2 hours before they were eaten?

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    1. Yes. I think that would be fine, as long as the temperature they're sitting in is reasonable, and not like a humid 95 degrees.

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    2. Even then, they'd probably be okay, but I'd worry.

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  25. This recipe and the following comments are very instructive. Thank you. I am wondering how the German bakeries make their Strawberry cream. Perhaps a strawberry gelatin and/or instead of water strawberry juice?

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    1. Hmmm...I don't think I've ever had strawberry cream. I'll have to look that up.

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  26. hi! i am so happy to see that u answer all the comments! so hard to see that nowadays!
    i want to make this recipe, but, i guess because english is not my first language, i dont quite understand it!
    you first mix the gelatin with cold water?? does that work?? i've always had to mix with hot water.... does it actually dissove?

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    1. Jackie,
      First of all, your written English is great. I'd never be able to tell that it's your second language. :)
      The way I understand about the gelatin, is that you want to soften it first in the cold water. It's referred to as "blooming" the gelatin. This website tells a little about it: http://whatscookingamerica.net/gelatintip.htm
      So, the blooming softens the gelatin, and then adding the hot cream melts/dissolves the gelatin. I hope that clears it up, and I will reply if you have any more questions. I'm glad to be helpful.

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  27. I am making cupcakes for my cousins wedding at the end of the month and have been looking for a recipe for this kind of frosting!!! So glad I came upon it on Pinterest!! Clearly I'll have to test it out before that day but will enjoy eating my test frosting!!!

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    1. Yes--do test it first. I hope it turns out for you. Let me know how it goes!

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  28. Curious, if you wanted your frosting to be flavored, could you use flavored gelatin instead of the unflavored Knox gelatin?

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    1. That is an interesting question that I've never even thought of. I do think it would be worth testing out, though. I think I'd like to try orange cream. Hmmmm... I think I might have a project tomorrow. I'm pretty sure I'll have to figure out the proper ratio of flavored jello vs. unflavored gelatin. I really think I will try this though.

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    2. wondering if you ever got around to making this recipe with flavored gelatin? I am making orange cream cupcakes and thinking of using this recipe but with orange flavored gelatin.

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    3. Alyssa, I have not gotten around to it. I am curious. I just never seem to have the time to satisfy my curiosity. :/

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  29. Can you use this as icing on cakes? I love the whipped icing on Walmart cakes, is this the same as that? Thanks

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    1. Sure, you can use this as icing on cakes. I haven't had a Walmart cake with whipped icing, but unless it's refrigerated, it's probably a "whipped topping" they use. When I worked at a church camp in the bakery, we used a powdered whipped topping to which I think we added water. It wasn't as sweet as a regular frosting, and it was creamy, but it was definitely non-dairy. I think the brand Dream Whip is either similar or the same thing. Below is a link to the WalMart site that has a photo of the box it comes in. But, to bottom line it--yes, you can use the recipe above to frost a cake. :)
      http://www.walmart.com/ip/Dream-Whip-2-Ct-Whipped-Topping-Mix-2.6-oz/10292569

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  30. Thank you so much for this tip I will be using this on my next fruit topped cake

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  31. THANK YOU for this recipe. I LOVE this frosting and always wondered how they got the whipped cream to keep its stiff consistency in the store-bought cakes. Also, Marie Callenders Restaurants use this frosting on the edge of the Boston cream pie, which used to be my all-time favorite, but I just can't eat anymore because it's too darn sweet. Now I can make it at home. 8-D

    Debbie in San Francisco

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    1. You're welcome! I hope you really enjoy your Boston cream pie! :)

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  32. Hi, I've been looking and looking for a whipped cream frosting recipe that is stabilized, and would hold good for one whole day, or even more (refrigerated). Your recipe looks good, and your picture of the chocolate pie slice after 2 days gives me huge motivation!
    Thank you!! :)

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    1. You're welcome! I was hoping that the 2-day slice of pie would help motivate people. :)

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  33. Great information-thanks. My Mom was German, and she used a product in a small paper packet (about like unsweetened koolaid comes in) called "Whip it" by Dr Oetker.
    The package says it is stabilizer for whipping cream. Ingredients list dextrose, modified corn starch and tricalcium phosphate. You use one package to I cup of unwhipped cream. I find it at World Market. Amy in LA

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  34. If you need a frosting that taste like whipped cream but pipes more like buttercream frosting I would try the Ermine Frosting. The recipe I use is 2c. Milk, 6TBS Flour, 2 Cups granulated sugar, 1TBS Vanilla paste, and 4 Sticks of butter. It makes enough for about 48 cupcakes. I use it a lot for the restaurant we have. It is a Chinese restaurant and the desserts cannot be too sweet but the whipped cream wasn't as good for the decorations I wanted to do. I first learned about it on Ehow.com doing research. This one does take some time to make but is well worth a try.

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    1. Hmmm...that sounds interesting. You just whip it all together in the mixer?

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    2. Bring to a boil 2c. Milk and 6TBS Flour. Make sure you stir the whole time. I use a small whisk so I don't get lumps or anything sticking to the pot. Let it boil for about 45 sec to a min. Then pour it into a bowl for cooling. (Cover with plastic wrap so you don't get a skin on top.)
      Take 4 sticks of unsalted butter at room temp and mix until fluffy, slowly add sugar and continue beating until it lightens in color, it will be almost white. Add your room temp base, and whip for about 5-10 min. I do it until it looks well combined and kind of like cool whip. Add your Vanilla 1TBS and Blend. At this point put it in the fridge for 10 to 15 min. You don't want to go longer because it will get too stiff. It may look like it isn't smooth but it will pipe smooth once you start.
      http://meltingpotcook.blogspot.com/ There is a picture of how it turns out on the Red Velvet cupcakes along with the recipe. My mother-n-law got upset when she found out I was posting my recipes so I had to stop. The ones I did are still up there.

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    3. I don't know about having flour on my frosting and sounds like a lot of work. I'll stick with the recipe.

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  35. This sounds like the solution I have been looking for...have you tried tinting this recipe? I am decorating for a baby shower and light blue would be perfect.

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    1. I have not tried tinting it, but I think it's a great idea. I don't know why it wouldn't work. If you think of it, let me know if you try it and how you like it. :)

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  36. Ive been looking for a recipe like this for months! Would this work with any other flavors added into the mix such as chocolate?

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    1. I've never tried other flavors, but I've often thought about trying it out on my cocoa whipped cream frosting (also on this blog). I've thought about trying to use Jello gelatin to make orange whipped cream or something like that. I'm just not sure of the application of such a flavor, so I haven't tried it yet.
      By the way, the cocoa whipped cream is already somewhat stable when you put it on cakes and cupcakes because of the cocoa powder. I think the gelatin would just make it easier to keep out longer and have it hold its shape.

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    2. I melted some dark chocolate into the heavy whipping cream before adding it to the final stage. It worked and tasted fantastic! Thanks again!

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  37. Can you use heavy cream instead of whipping cream?

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    1. I always use heavy whipping cream. I don't even know if regular whipping cream is available where I live... Thanks for pointing that out. I'll make an adjustment to my recipe.

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  38. Was thinking of piping whiped cream into hearts on a cookie sheet and freeze for hot coco later for kids but wasn't sure how well it would hold shape for it to freeze. This I think will work . Thank you :)

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  39. Was thinking of piping whiped cream into hearts on a cookie sheet and freeze for hot coco later for kids but wasn't sure how well it would hold shape for it to freeze. This I think will work . Thank you :)

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    1. I think that's a great idea! I think it would freeze nicely. I just had to freeze some cocoa whipped cream that didn't firm up for some reason (probably because it was for my fancy Thanksgiving dinner), and it froze hard as a rock. Therefore, I think freezing whipped cream hearts would totally work. Let me know how it goes, though!

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  40. Can you show me how to get whipped cream become white color, because I always get it cream color. I don't know why. Thanks for your recipe

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    1. I don't do anything special to get the white color. I think maybe there are differences in the color of cream depending on where you live and what is available. I think you'd have to start out with cream that is white, which is what mine is around here in Iowa. Sorry I can't give you more information than that theory.

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  41. Awesome recipe! Thanks so much for sharing! :)

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    1. You're welcome! Thanks for letting me know you liked it! :)

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  42. You mentioned your ISI Cream Whipper but haven't indicated how to use that with this recipe. Do I take it to the 'whip' stage and pour it into the container to do it's magic? Or do I have to put it through a strainer before had to avoid clogs? Thanks!

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    1. I suppose I should explain myself better about that. When I use the isi whipped cream dispenser, I do not stabilize the whipped cream because I just dispense the whipped cream as I serve the dessert. It's only when I want something to look pretty for a period of time that I go to the trouble of making and piping the stabilized whipped cream. So when I do the dispenser, it's just cream and a little powdered sugar in there. Sorry I don't have any wisdom for you about using the stabilized cream in the dispenser. :/

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    2. Thanks! I got my ISI (Cream Profi Whip) at a church bazaar and love it. I think that straining the gelatin after adding the scalded cream and then putting it all in the whipper might work. All directions that came with the ISI say to strain to avoid clogs. I want to make the 3 bite pies for our Auxiliary events and to be able to make them all up the day before with your stabilized whip cream would be a real time saver. Thank you again! I found your blog on Pinterest and it had been re-pinned a lot of times!

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    3. What an awesome find at a church bazaar! Now that I think of it, I got my favorite cookie sheets for like 50 cents each at a church yard sale... I need to go to more of those. I guess churchies are bakers. I mean, I go to church. Makes sense. :)
      Straining sounds like a good plan. If you think of it, please let me know how it goes. And I'm so happy to hear my post has been re-pinned on Pinterest. I owe most of my blog traffic to them.

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  43. Hi, I tried this recipe but I could not get it to hold its shape, I also tried vanilla pudding mix it tasted awful just like pudding and it was runny, but I am happy to tell u I just made a mousse with raspberry extract and it's perfect ty so for posting this recipe!

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    1. Bummer. Did you use heavy cream? Was it super cold? I don't know why whipped cream is temperamental sometimes. One of my recent batches of cocoa whipped cream fell flat, and I have no idea why, except maybe that it was thanksgiving and I had a house full of people and maybe the whipped cream was picking up on my stress. :)

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  44. Lol, I think your whipped cream had a holiday "melt down" ! I have those allot without the holiday whip cream is very fussy! Lol
    Yes my whipped cream was cold not the bowl though I think thats why, but I have tried this recipe 3 other times by adding extra gelatine, once I added to much gelatine and it came out like bread dough lol it tasted great cuz I it was coffee flavored, but I was wondering if I used 1 tsp gelatine instead of a 1/2 or should I just practice with your recipe, making sure the bowl and beaters are cold! I really think u should try the chocolate mouse omg it is so good! I love it! Ty,
    Debbie :)

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    1. Yep, I think "holiday melt down" about sums it up. :) As far as trying a full teaspoon of gelatine, that's up to you. I hate to say it like this because it would bug me if someone were to say it to me in this instance, but the half teaspoon always works for me. The cocoa whipped cream, not so much, but the stabilized whipped cream, yes. My final suggestion is to try a different brand of heavy cream. If you have the time and extra cream, though, go ahead and try a full teaspoon of gelatine and report back to me. :)

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  45. Well I tried it, it worked great, but I only let the gelatine set in fridge for 10 min and it was kinda lumpy, little tiny gelatine chunks r in it but u really dont notice it when eating the pie, so next I will only use the softest part of the gelatine, or only let it set for 8 min. I just want u to know how greatful I am u posted this recipe, I have been looking for a stablized whipped cream recipe for 30 years, and this recipe is easy, and delicious!!! Ty ty ty!!!
    Debbie :)

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    1. Well, I am so glad to have been helpful. Really, it's one of my main motivations in doing this blog. Thanks for letting me know how it turned out. :)

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  46. Thank you for the recipe! Do you know how many cupcakes will this recipe frost?

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    1. I haven't used this particular recipe to frost cupcakes, but I know I use two cups of cream for my cocoa whipped cream cupcakes, and I end up with enough of that to frost about 30 cupcakes. So, this is just a guess, but I think this recipe would frost about 18. You could probably just increase it by half and be good for 24 cupcakes. Hope that helps. :/

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  47. does it have to be gelatin powder? can i use unflavoured gelatin for this?

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    1. The only form I've seen unflavored gelatin is powder. If you have it in another form (like I think I've seen sheets of it used on TV), then you'll probably have to experiment with it, but I think it would work.

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  48. OK, I'm literally in the middle of trying to make this recipe and am desperate for it to work. I just checked my gelatin/water/two tablespoons of whipping cream from being in the fridge for 15 minutes and its not thickened at all (like egg whites that you mentioned.) Help! What do I do now? Use it anyway? Or won't it work? LMK Thanks!!! Laura

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    1. Laura, I'm so sorry I left you hanging in your desperation! My email was having issues and I'm not getting my comments that way, so I missed it. I hope the gelatin mixture firmed up for you eventually. Sometimes it seems to take longer, but once it firms up it seems to happen quickly. Please let me know how it worked out, and again, I'm sorry I didn't get back to you until now. :/

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  49. Hello! I'm preparing to have a cupcake tasting in a week, what is your suggestion time for storing whipped icing from your recipe? Also, approximately how many regular cupcakes size cupcakes can be decorated using your recipe. Thanks in advance!

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  50. Hello!
    I'm in planning mode for my cupcake tasting next week, how long do you suggest storing whipped icing from your recipe? Also, approximately how many regular size cupcakes can be decorated using your recipe? I also so yields for cakes and pies. Thanks in advance. :)

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    1. I am so sorry I didn't see this comment unti now! Something has gone whacky with my email and I haven't been getting notifications of comments! Yikes! It's probably too late now, but I would suggest only about 2-3 days for storage of the whipped icing in the refrigerator. It looks prettiest if it's piped right after whipping, and then it stays nice on the finished product. It doesn't look quite as smooth after it's been in the fridge unpiped for a day or so, if that makes sense.
      One recipe would generously frost 12 cupcakes, with some leftover, I think. I'm really going off my experience with my cocoa whipped cream on that, though, so please correct me if I'm wrong. Oh, and it will frost two pies. Although it says how many cakes it frosts above, that was based on the CD Kitchens recipe, but I have not tried it. I hope that helps!

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  51. I can't wait to try this on a strawberry pie, or shortcake. Thanks!

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  52. Hello :) great site! I was just wondering about the salt amount that is mentioned in the steps ('salt and sugar' of step 4) as it isn't specified in the ingredients amounts prior. I am assuming it means that it is a very scant pinch of salt probably but wanted to ask just to be certain. allykins1987@gmail.com
    thanks :D

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    1. Sorry about that. I was looking over the recipe yesterday, and I realized that I don't add the salt anymore, so omitted it. Then when I was looking over the directions, I was wondering where the salt was, and then I wondered why nobody ever asked when to add the salt. At any rate, I've omitted the pinch of salt because I just never add it. I probably used to, but now I don't. I'll email this reply to you as well. Again, sorry for the confusion. :/

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  53. Looks great, I am definately going to be using this recipe. Cudos to you for being so patient and helpful with all the questions.

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  54. hello,

    i am wondering if it is really possible to use powdered gelatin mixed with UHT all purpose cream (less than 30% fat content) for use on my ISI cream-profi whipper(0.5liter) to make the cream stiff or stay stiff longer?

    How much quantity of gelatin should i use for the 0.5liter ISI to make it stiff? or could you please suggest how to make cream stiff? (i have followed all instructions except the use of heavy cream because heavy cream is not available here in my place).

    thanks in advance. have a nice day.

    july from the philippines.

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    1. July, I have not yet tried using the gelatin/cream mixture in my isi dispenser. I know that my dispenser will hold 2 cups of cream, so, I think you might be able double the recipe, do the gelatin and mix it with the small amount of hot cream and chill that until it's cooled, but not solid, and then whisk it with the remaining heavy cream and sugar and then pout it into the dispenser and use as normal. One commenter mentioned above that she strained the mixture before putting it in the dispenser because her dispenser instructions suggested that.
      I hope that makes sense, and that if you try it that it does not mess up your dispenser. Let me know how it goes if you try it.

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  55. An easier way to stabilize whipped cream is to add 1/4 to 1/2 tsp cornstarch for each cup of heavy cream. Add it as the cream starts to thicken and you add the sugar and vanilla. It will keep it's form for hours. As for displays, the general rule of thumb is that dairy products will keep for 4 hours total at room temp. This means from the time you take the cream out to make the whipped cream until they are eaten. This is from the national ServSafe food safety course, and room temp is defined as being between 40 and 140 degrees.

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    1. Are you sure that 140 degrees is the correct max temp.? Seems pretty hot and would be unbearable for people to deal with that temp.-also, most people don't live in the desert.

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    2. Veronica, I didn't even notice that extreme max temp. I hope Anonymous replies. :)

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  56. How do you change this recipe to make chocolate whipped cream? Could I add instant chocolate pudding powder, melted (and cooled) baking chocolate, or just cocoa powder?
    Thanks.

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    1. Veronica, I would make my cocoa whipped cream and add the gelatin mixture as the cocoa whipped cream starts whipping. Look at this recipe (http://food-pusher.blogspot.com/2012/01/chocolate-cake-with-cocoa-whipped-cream.html) for the cocoa whipped cream recipe.

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  57. I have never tasted a whipped frosting like this before... but it sounds perfect for what I am thinking. I am hosting a baby shower on Saturday at 10am, so we are doing a "brunch-style" spread. I wanted to make a Banana Walnut cake, but need the frosting to be very light and not overly-sweet. (I don't know about you, but I generally don't think of heavy buttercream frosting for breakfast...) And actually, the cake itself turns out to be more like a lighter version of banana bread.

    Because you seem very familiar with this frosting, what is your opinion? Would you use this to frost a Banana Walnut cake/bread? Thanks in advance for a response! Appreciate you for sharing this recipe!

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    1. Mmm...this sounds delicious. I think this frosting could work, but I might go with something slightly richer, like the mascarpone frosting I use for whoopie pies (http://food-pusher.blogspot.com/2011/10/whoopie-pies-with-mascarpone-frosting.html). It still tastes light, in the sense that it's not too sweet, but it's thicker, like a frosting. This whipped cream frosting is very light--just like whipped cream. You could also make it with a heavier cream, like I've gotten at Trader Joe's, if you have one close to you. For some reason their heavy cream is super thick. I agree with you, though, you don't want a heavy buttercream type frosting for a brunch. Now that I think of it, I recently had a nice banana cake with a relatively light cream cheese frosting... so many possibilities. If you think of it, let me know what you decide and how it goes. :)

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  58. Please explain how to scald the cream.
    Thanks

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    1. You just put the cream in a small saucepan and bring it just up to a boil. Then you remove it from the heat immediately.

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  59. Hi there. Is there any way I can work out a cream cheese frosting using this recipe? Thanks :-)

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    1. NAEMAH, if you're looking for a cream cheese type frosting, this is not it. The beauty of this frosting is that it is light--not heavy, not very sweet. It's just whipped cream. If you want something heavier, the mascarpone frosting I use on whoopie pies is really good. http://food-pusher.blogspot.com/2011/10/whoopie-pies-with-mascarpone-frosting.html
      If you're looking for a cream cheese frosting, you may have to look elsewhere. I know allrecipes.com has some great frosting recipes and they've been reviewed and rated by other cooks. Good luck!

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  60. Thanks for this! I am making my daughter a white cake (dense like pound cake) with strawberry filling and decorating it with swirl roses (pink of course!) Well, I wanted to go with the strawberry pound cake with whipped cream. Well, regular whipped cream won't hold its shape and it was suggested I stabilize it. I google searched and found your recipe. THANKS!! I'll post later on how it turned out. :)

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    1. You're welcome, Stephanie! Your plan sounds great, and I'd love to hear about how it turns out! :)

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  61. I just tried this recipe and it did not hold its shape. I was very dissapointed because the pictures look great.When I whipped the sugar and cream it looked good but once I added the gelatine mixture it lost it's peaks and went into like butter :(

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    1. I'm sorry it didn't turn out for you. It sounds like maybe you whipped it a little too long before adding the gelatin mixture. I only whip mine to very soft peaks before adding it, and then I only have to beat it another10-20 seconds. Maybe I should write it that way in the recipe. Thanks for letting me know what happened.

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  62. Thanks for this - never been here before/heard of your blog, but as a fellow DSMer, recognized the Sheeder bottle (best milk ever) on someone's Pinboard + had to see where it came from. I'm off to explore the heck outta this blog!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Well, I'm glad you found me. :) Hope you find some recipes you like!

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  63. Have you ever tried doubling this recipe? Just curious

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    1. Marge, I do double this recipe all the time with great results. Perhaps I need to make that comment in the recipe. Thanks for asking!

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  64. Hi there. I was reading through some of the comments but not all of them... so I'm sorry if you already answered this... we make a "fruit salad" with cut up fruit and homemade whipped cream (heavy cream, vanilla, and sugar). The problem is that it disintegrates so fast. Do you think this recipe would work for that. Thank you!

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    1. Hmmm... that's a really good question. Although I've not tried it myself, I think that it would probably work if you didn't include the fruits they say to not put into Jell-O, like pineapple. I googled "fruits that stop jello from setting" and got this link that sounds intelligent: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/766930
      I figure it's worth a try. Otherwise, I might try beating in some mascarpone cheese, which I just discovered is mainly just fresh cream; http://www.bakingobsession.com/2009/05/02/homemade-mascarpone-cheese/
      So...the short answer is that I have not tried it, nor have I heard of anyone trying it, but I think it MIGHT work. :)
      Please do let me know if you try it and what happens.

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  65. Hi! Just found this post on Pinterest. Do you think adding some vanilla extract would change it at all? I like to add a little to my whipped cream but don't know if it would react with the gelatin at all.

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    1. I don't think adding vanilla would cause any problems with this recipe. I say go for it. :)

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  66. I just saw this on Pinterest. I live in a warm climate so this recipe is just what I need to keep from having melty whipped cream!

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  67. Have you tried to use the ISI cream whipper with the gelatin? I wonder if it might work in that method as well. If you have not tried it then I might and let you know the results.

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  68. Have you tried using this gelatin method in your ISI whipper? I think it might work. If you have not tried it then I may, and I will let you know.

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    1. Another commenter has tried the gelatin method in the ISI whipper with good results. I'd like to hear how it turns out for you, too, though, so please let me know.
      Thanks!

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  69. when i did this is was WAYY runny...i couldn't even put it in a piping bag, it would just ooze out. I put marshmallow creme in it and it worked perfectly though! tastes great too!! The marshmallow creme also helped thicken it. Do you know what i couldve done wrong to make it runny?

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    1. Hmmmm... Was the heavy cream really cold? I could only guess as to what might have been the problem. Every now and then I have a whipped cream flop on me too, although I don't think it's happened with this recipe. It happened with my cocoa whipped cream on Thanksgiving. I know this isn't an answer, but if you're willing, I say try it again. But apparently make sure tiy have some marshmallow cream on hand. :)

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  70. Found this on pinterest and used it to make homemade hostess cupcakes, so easy and.absolutely amazing!

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  71. I have also used piping gel as a stabilized and no need to add sugar as the gel is already sweetened. Works great too.

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  72. Does this have to be refrigerated eventually or can cakes stay at room temp after being frosted? Thanks

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    1. Kim, cakes and things frosted with this need to stay refrigerated until ready to serve. It can stay out for like a party or something for about 3 hours, and the whipped cream will keep its shape, but it does eventually need to go back in the fridge for storage.

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  73. Tried the stabilized whipped cream and it didn't hold up as well as when I have used cornstarch. Followed directions as stated-it's very warm today-maybe that was the problem?!
    Someone previously mentioned Ermine Frosting-it isn't like whipped cream, but it is the BEST frosting for a swiss chocolate or banana cake. Was my grandmother's 'go to' and the frosting everyone still asks for at birthdays.

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  74. Would this be a good topping for an ice cream cake?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I've never tried to freeze it on anything, but I think that would work.

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  75. What do you mean by scald the cream?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Sorry. I need to revise the recipe to include that. It just means to put the cream in a pan on the stove and bring it just up to a simmer.

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  76. If you double or triple the recipe, would u use less gelatin?

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    1. I would actually increase the gelatin proportionally if I doubled or tripled the recipe. Actually, I have done that. It works. So, if you're doubling the recipe, use 1 teaspoon gelatin powder; tripling the recipe, use 1 1/2 teaspoons, etc.

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  77. And does this taste the same as plain sweetened whipped cream?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Yes. The gelatin does not change the flavor of the whipped cream.

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  78. How much gelatin have to add for stablelise for 2cups cream and 2cups yogurt ?

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    1. I'm sorry, Wang Hong Hong. I have no idea if yogurt even works to make whipped cream. Have you ever used it before? I suppose I would just make sure I use 1/2 teaspoon of powdered gelatin for every cup of "liquid" that you use. Let me know if you try it and how it goes.

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  79. Thanks for reply, actually, after I whipped the 2cups of cream, I fold the cream into the 2cps of yogurt, I used 2 tsp of gelatin and melt with 1 tbsp of water also work, actually yogurt consider a cream ? My I have a fix formula using gelatin to stablelise the cream as recipe stated below

    2cups whipping cream mix with
    2cups yogurt and
    2cups fruit puree
    This cream I want to apply on my crepe
    Tq

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    1. Well, that sounds interesting. Did it work out for you putting the gelatin in it?

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  80. Hello! I used the recipe for the first time the other day and had the same problem some others encountered. I was using the whipped cream as a border for an ice cream cake and after piping halfway around the cake, the frosting broke down, becoming too runny to pipe. In your response to Anonymous above, you asked whether the whipped cream was really cold. In order to prevent the weeping, I assume the whipped cream should be as cold as possible; is this correct? Also, I think I left my gelatin in the fridge too long. Is it possible my problem was caused by that? Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Shoot! I'm sorry that happened to you. The cream should be really cold. Maybe you didn't whip is long enough? I just revised the recipe to hopefully account for that. After adding the gelatin I beat it until stiff peaks start to form. Under beating or just bad luck are my only two guesses about your problem. :/ It does work most of the time. Don't give up on it.
      What did you end up doing with your ice cream cake, by the way?

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  81. Good morning! What a beautiful 4th of July! First of all thank you for sharing your kitchen talents! When i make strawberry shortcakes i always use heavy cream that's beaten to soft peaks and then mix in powdered sugar. I've got strawberries picked yesterday that are screaming to be used. Do you think your recipe would be a good substitute? It looks and sounds delish by the way and i can't wait to try it!

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    1. Jennifer, I think this would be a great sub for regular whipped cream, especially if you want to do it ahead of time. It also keeps well if you have leftovers. :)

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  82. Hi, I hope you can help me. I'm making 180 tiramisu cupcakes and need a stiff mascarpone frosting so that they'll stay pretty while on display for about 3 to 6 hours max. People make mascarpone frosting differently though, some whip the cream first, some whip the cheese and cream together. My question is, if I add gelatin to either method, do you think it would help the mascarpone hold its shape? Thanks!

    Mindy

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    1. Hi, Mindy. I think the gelatin would work with the mascarpone frosting. I actually made some cupcakes with a mascarpone whipped cream frosting, and although I toyed with the idea of putting the gelatin in, I opted not to because I was going to frost them on-site, and I didn't want to deal with it. We were in an air conditioned facility, and the cupcakes were out for 4-5 hours, and they stayed looking very nice (although the raspberry on top started to bleed slightly, if you must know). If you have time, I would recommend giving it a trial run and let a cupcake sit out in the expected environment (inside/outside) for that many hours, and see what happens.
      I know you probably already have a recipe you're going to use, but just so you can see what I used and what worked for the wedding I did, here's a link that has the mascarpone frosting recipe and how I prepared it (which was to whip the sugar and mascarpone and then add the whipping cream). http://www.food-pusher.com/2013/05/white-cupcakes-with-whipped-mascarpone.html
      Good luck! And if you think of it, please let me know what you ended up doing and how it turned out. :)

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    2. I just looked at my recipe again, and my mascarpone recipe is different. I actually used two cups of whipping cream per 8 oz. of mascarpone, just to make it really light, and that is what sat out for 4-5 hours. I did the frosting with one cup of cream for the actual little wedding cake, because I thought it would be more firm, but now that I think about it, it felt even softer to me than the 2 cups of whipped cream version.
      I'm new at this mass cupcake making thing, so I do not have it down pat.

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  83. Anyone tried in a humid weather? I'm in humid country all year round. Wonder if this will work here... Please advice

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    Replies
    1. Mae Cheah,
      It gets pretty humid where I live in Iowa, and this whipped cream remains stable even in humid weather. I mean, you don't want to leave it sitting out for too long, but it can stand a couple of hours in warm humid weather.

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  84. Anyone tried in a humid weather? I'm in humid country all year round. Wonder if this will work here... Please advice

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  85. Hello. Thank you for sharing this recipe. Ive used whipped cream frosting in the past and its always melted within an hour or so but ive never used gelatin in the recipe. I just have a few questions, will adding vanilla or almond extract and food coloring effect the stabilization?
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know if I've tried adding any of those things, but I don't think they'd have any effect of the stabilization. I would add it at the beginning of the whipping stage. Let me know if it works out okay for you.

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  86. I can't wait to try this recipe! Can I color this frosting?

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    Replies
    1. Although I've never tried it myself, I don't think there would be any problem adding color to this frosting.

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  87. This recipe is awesome! My father and I make banana cakes every Sunday morning and we have been looking for a whipped cream frosting and happened to stumble upon this recipe. It worked great for our cakes, except we had trouble with whipping it because we where afraid that we would over whip it and ended up under-whipping it. How long do usually whip it for after you put the gelatin mixture in?

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I usually only whip another 10 to 15 seconds after adding the gelatin mix. I used to go longer for stiff peaks, but now I try to go for a little bit softer peaks. The gelatin helps it keep its shape so I don't need to whip it as long as before.

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    3. I'm trying to do these comments on my cell phone and I'm having trouble. :/ At any rate, I'm glad you have found the recipe. Please let me know if you try it again and whether it works better for you the next time.

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  88. Hi, I have a bake sale coming up and the weather in the city is pretty humid and hot. I would have to ice the cupcakes in the morning and keep them the whole day (10am to 7pm, if they last so long). Would this recipe work in that case? Can you give other ideas since the buttercream recipe I use starts sweating and leaking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmmm...under these circumstances, I would not make anything that had any kind of frosting on it other than a royal icing that dries very hard on cookies. If you have access to a cooler of some sort, you could probably do cupcakes with frosting, but if you don't, I recommend baking something like cookies, muffins, or scones. With the whipped cream, even though it's stable, it's still made with fresh cream and I'm afraid it might go rancid if it were to be out in the heat for that long. Sorry. I'm sure it wasn't the answer you were looking for. :/

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  89. Wow this recipe looks perfect. Thank you for sharing. Also thank you for being so patient with the questions asked. Your go girl!

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  90. Thank you for the tips, and patience. You go girl!

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    1. You're welcome. And thanks for noticing. :)

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  91. I just wanted to take time to Thank YOU so much for sharing this frosting recipe with the world, it is absolutely AWESOME!!!! Today was my grandson's 1st Birthday Party, so I decided to use this frosting instead of buttercream and everyone, I mean EVERYONE couldn't say enough about how good it was. They loved it and so did I. It's a wonderful light frosting, similar to that of a Cassata Cake. It is also extremely easy to make and inexpensive. Thank YOU soooo much again!!!!

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    1. Wow! I appreciate your enthusiastic thank you! :) I'm glad that you and everyone at the party enjoyed the frosting. I know that it always makes me happy.

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  92. This recipe looks perfect for the cupcakes I'm going to make for my daughter's bday on Sunday!! As it is going to be a spongebob theme...will it be possible to make it BRIGHT yellow??

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    1. Oh my gosh. Somehow this comment got overlooked a couple of weeks ago. :/ Did you try the bright yellow? I think it would have worked and I hope you tried it with success. In case you did not try and want to know what I would do...I would use gel paste food color because it's so intense and you only need to use a relatively small amount to achieve a bright color, and I don't think it would affect the texture of the whipped cream. Again, sorry I didn't get back to you in time. Please let me know how it turned out.

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  93. Thank you so much for this stabilizing hint. I am looking for your professional opinion. I have a 3 hour drive Thanksgiving morning and was wondering if I could go ahead and ice my pumpkin pie, or should I transport my whipped cream in a cooler and assemble at my destination. The temperature in my car will probably be approx 75 degrees. I appreciate your help and happy turkey day!

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    Replies
    1. If it were me, I would go with the second option, transporting the whipped cream in a cooler and assembling at your destination. I say this mostly because of the 75 degree car because it will also be served at the end of the meal. I hope it turns out for you! Happy Thanksgiving! :)

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  94. Everything was fine up until I added the gelatin mixture to the cream and confectioner's sugar. Then it almost immediately turned to a soup with a big mass in the bowl. Help?

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    Replies
    1. That's weird. Was the gelatin chilled and just starting to firm up? Was the cream really cold? Every once in a while whipped cream doesn't turn out for me and I can't figure out why. Try it again if you have the time, ingredients, and inclination. Sorry I can't give you more than that.

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  95. Wonderful recipe! I tried it last weekend and it turned out great. I had great raves from the family. I'd like to make a chocolate version as well. Any ideas? (Sorry for the anonymous posts, I don't have any other accounts that I remember my passwords to!) -Kim

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    Replies
    1. I have a recipe for stabilized cocoa whipped cream here: http://www.food-pusher.com/2013/02/cocoa-whipped-cream.html
      It's been a long time since I've made this. Please let me know if it's what you're looking for and if you try it. Good luck!

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  96. I was so happy to find your recipe to stabilize whipped cream on Pinterest. I have read the recipe and all of the comments and I am just wondering, did you ever try adding flavored gelatin to the whipped cream instead of the unflavored? I think I am going to try that but need an idea of amount to add.

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    1. I never did try the flavored gelatin. I think it's because in my mind I have two options: 1. Make a batch and eat it all here at home or 2. Make white cupcakes with flavored whipped cream on top and take it to an event. Since I have so little time to bake freely, when I do take something to an event, I like it to be something tried and true. Maybe this spring break I'll try it...

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  97. For those of you who have asked about using flavored gelatin, I've finally given it a try. Here's the link to the results: http://www.food-pusher.com/2014/02/flavored-stabilized-whipped-cream.html

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  98. I've always do no bake cheesecake. And I use whipped cream and I hope I could incorporate this to the cheesecream and makes it stabilize. Thanks for this.

    ReplyDelete

Hello! If your comment is more of a question about something you are cooking RIGHT NOW, please email me the question in addition to posting it here. I check my email more frequently than I check my blog comments. :)
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